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Pneumonia epidemic: the New Crest virus outbreak changed the global greeting etiquette

Pneumonia epidemic: the New Crest virus outbreak changed the global greeting etiquette

Bella Dali-Steele, Ruth Tray(Bella Dally-Steele & Ruth Terry)

"Wuhan-style greeting" first appeared in China, and then spread around the world.Image copyrightALEX LIEW/GETTY IMAGESImage caption"Wuhan-style greeting" first appeared in China, and then spread around the world.

The pandemic of the new coronavirus has fundamentally changed the way humans interact with each other, because physical contact spreads the virus, and as a result, the culture of greeting with physical contact has also become a victim. However, the way people around the world adapt to this new situation shows that we humans have not lost the urge to meet and say "hello".

Meeting greetings may seem simple, but it has a deep meaning. Verbal and non-verbal greetings can help us define the boundaries of interaction with others.

Alessandro Duranti, an anthropology professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, said, "Say hello to people is a bit like a sponge to absorb water. We used greetings to absorb all these different messages, such as me and me. What is the relationship between people, and what kind of people are we, etc. Greetings and greetings are not only a small interaction between people, but also a response to an event that is happening in a broader context." According to Du Randy said that this incident at this time should refer to the outbreak of the new coronavirus pandemic in the world.

From the ancient Indian hands-to-nose ceremony, to the newly launched elbow greetings by American politicians, the way people change their greetings due to the outbreak of the new coronavirus can also reflect their cultural connotations. In order to know more about the culture of meeting ceremonies in different regions, we interviewed local people in seven countries to understand the cultural significance of traditional greetings in these countries and how the new coronary pneumonia pandemic changed these traditions.

Thanks to the high-profile propaganda of many well-known politicians, elbows touching each other have greeted each other instead of shaking hands in some places in the United States.Image copyrightMANDEL NGAN/GETTY IMAGESImage captionThanks to the high-profile propaganda of many well-known politicians, elbows touching each other have greeted each other instead of shaking hands in some places in the United States.

China

Perhaps the most striking greeting recently appeared is "Wuhan-style greeting", which is an alternative way of shaking hands, named after Wuhan, the birthplace of the new coronary pneumonia. This kind of "hello" that touched each other with the soles of the shoes became popular after the video went viral in March this year. After the first appearance of "Wuhan-style greeting", well-known politicians such as Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak and Tanzanian President John Magufuli have performed publicly, which caused speculation, "Wuhan Whether the "style greeting" will become the new style of greetings in the world.

However, "Wuhan-style greeting" seems unlikely to replace the more typical Chinese greetings, such as the modern handshake, or the 3,000-year-old arches and bows that are still used in Chinese New Year, weddings, or other celebrations. Despite extensive media coverage, Wuhan-style greetings have not yet become the norm for meeting in other parts of China, and it is not even a well-known thing. Shi Chuangang, a cultural anthropologist at the University of Florida, said that the Wuhan-style greeting is just a mimic version of a relaxed and funny handshake after maintaining social distance.

Professor Shi Chuangang said: "People (hello in Wuhan style) are to show that even in such a difficult time, we can express the intimacy between people in such a ridiculous way. Everyone just wants to have fun, so Invented this imitation version."

The latest greetings for pneumonia epidemic situation-"Wuhan style greeting"

new Zealand

A week before the World Health Organization announced the new coronavirus as a global pandemic infectious disease, indigenous Maori groups throughout New Zealand had instructed Maori to avoid traditional hongi hellos throughout the country, that is, two Personal greetings stick the nose and forehead together.

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern quickly conveyed this message to the whole country, urging all New Zealanders to "stop shaking hands, hug and nose touch".

Meeting and touching noses has a deep meaning in New Zealand Maori culture, and is also used by many other New Zealanders and foreign visitors.Image copyrightCHRIS JACKSONImage captionMeeting and touching noses has a deep meaning in New Zealand Maori culture, and is also used by many other New Zealanders and foreign visitors.

Rangi Matamua, a professor of indigenous cultural studies at the University of Waikato in New Zealand, said that many Maori people began to raise their chins and eyebrows at random to say hello. This type of nodding greeting was already common before the outbreak of new coronary pneumonia, not necessarily unique to Maori, but in the short term it has replaced the nose touch.

Nose touch has a profound meaning in New Zealand Maori culture. The Maori creation myth says that Tan, the god of the forest, used his nose to convey the breath of life to the first woman of mankind. Mathama said that despite the mythology, the refusal to touch the nose gave little resistance. This may be because the Maori followed similar guidelines during the Spanish flu in 1918. The Spanish pandemic left a deadly mark on New Zealand that tragically highlighted the Maori belief in the origin of life.

Matamah quoted a Maori proverb saying, "Everything in the world is precious", so if customs and traditions are not applicable or will hurt people, we will change it."

France

During the Spanish pandemic in 1918, the French did not encourage veneer ceremonies, that is, the practice of friends meeting and kissing each others cheeks, which is called Bises in French, but in this new pandemic pneumonia pandemic, It takes longer for France to stop kissing her cheeks than for New Zealand Maori to stop touching their noses.

Less than a week before the French government implemented the home segregation order, 66% of French respondents said they were still performing veneer ceremonies. By the end of March, the number of French personal veneers had dropped to 6%. At this time, the French replaced the actual cheeks with an oral version, that is, greeted each other at a distance and said "Bises!", or more people are familiar with " Bisous!".

During the global pandemic of the new coronavirus, many French people were reluctant to give up the famous French meeting at first, that is, kiss each other on the cheeks when meeting each other.Image copyrightNURPHOTO/GETTY IMAGESImage captionDuring the global pandemic of the new coronavirus, many French people were reluctant to give up the famous French meeting at first, that is, kiss each other on the cheeks when meeting each other.

There is a cultural precedent for using verbal cheeks instead, because during peak flu season, people who catch a cold sometimes just greet them orally and say "Bises" to each other. However, Claudine Gauthier, an anthropology professor at the University of Bordeaux in France, said that it is still very difficult to change nationwide, especially for French women. French men usually prefer to say hello with a handshake, while women generally use this cheek kiss to greet everyone, which may explain why some people do not want to give up.

Gautier believes that the French are generally reluctant to give up their cheeks because this way of greeting is increasingly important to the French cultural identity. Before the late 1960s, kissing the cheek was a kind of greeting etiquette showing intimacy, and it was only done between loved ones and children.

Kissing cheeks is now popular in France, symbolizing the informatization of French culture and societys restrictions on interaction between the opposite sex. Gautier said that refusing to kiss the cheek before announcing the social distance would be considered indifferent to the person, so whether the form of mere saying bises will continue after the new coronavirus pandemic will depend on this agreement Is the public health concept of greetings strong enough to prevent people from returning to the tradition of close kissing?

Tanzania

Alexander Mwijage, a social anthropologist at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, said that Tanzanian culture has a strong The spirit of collectivism is rooted in the interdependent system of members of society, and each member of society recognizes his own position in a society that values respect and inferiority.

Many Tanzanians gave up shaking hands, hugging, and bowing to the elders. The elders used traditional greetings such as touching the heads of the younger generations to pay their respects, instead of touching their feet.Image copyrightANADOLU AGENCYImage captionMany Tanzanians gave up shaking hands, hugging, and bowing to the elders. The elders used traditional greetings such as touching the heads of the younger generations to pay their respects, instead of touching their feet.

The greetings of body movements, such as bowing to the elders from the elders, and the elders touching the heads of the elders in return, are related to Tanzanias concept of respecting the elders. According to Mvijag, prolonged handshake, hugs, and kisses on cheeks are also common among peers.

He said that recently, greeting with feet like Wuhan in China, and bowing casually to people of any age at a distance have become a new way of greeting. Because these two ways of greeting are intentional to maintain a distance between people, but Mweiga fears that this will eventually damage the public relations of Tanzanians.

He said, "The new coronary pneumonia has created an alienated interpersonal relationship... It erodes the expression of respect and care for others. The legs are used to walk, not to say hello. Does it mean (to touch each other with your feet) to express love Does it show care and respect?"

According to Mvijags research, in Tanzania, the use of masks can also weaken the local peoples verbal and non-verbal expressions. For example, twisting lips is a common way to express consent and other emotions. He predicts that as the social distance continues, handshake and bowing will soon be replaced by more innovative ways of greeting.

Turkey

Turkeys greeting etiquette reflects the countrys Islamic traditions, hospitable culture and the social role of the elderly. When saying hello, young people clenched elders' hands to kiss, and then held elders' hands to touch their foreheads, especially during holidays. As for colleagues, friends, and even new people, kissing cheeks is a standard greeting mode.

Kenan Sharpe, a Turkish pop culture expert and journalist, said, "(Kissing cheeks) needs to be symmetrical and it needs to be kissed twice. This is complete. Kissing cheeks is always an even number here. There is a feeling like it is, if you Not kissing the other side is like doing something less."

After the outbreak of the New Coronavirus, many Turks recovered hundreds of years of old greetings "eyvallah", that is, put one hand on the heart, leaning forward slightly.Image copyrightANADOLU AGENCY/GETTY IMAGESImage captionAfter the outbreak of the New Coronavirus, many Turks recovered hundreds of years of old greetings "eyvallah", that is, put one hand on the heart, leaning forward slightly.

For the Turks, greetings are not only welcoming each other, but also showing that they are very important. After the global outbreak of New Coronavirus, the Turkish people turned to Islamic history for a popular way of greeting that preserved this value.

In Turkey, eyvallah is a greeting etiquette with hundreds of years of history that does not require physical contact. During the greeting, both parties put their right hands on their left chests and leaned forward slightly. Turks during the Ottoman Empire may say hello in this way. This action means that the other party expresses respect and intimacy in your heart. The root of the word eyvallah is Arabic, which means "we entrust everything to Allah". In the Muslim world, there are different versions of this greeting gesture.

In the more conservative Turkish community, eyvallah is a common way of greeting between the opposite sex. As the popular Turkish TV series "Resurrection: El Turur" appeared this greeting, which made the greeting method of covering his chest with his hands used by more people. This historical TV series in Turkey is about the legendary story of Ertuğrul, the leader of the Turks of the 13th century, whose son is Ottoman I, the founder of the Ottoman Empire. Contemporary Turkish leaders also adopted this meeting ceremony. On March 9, Turkish President Erdogan covered his chest with his hand to welcome NATO Secretary-General Stoltenberg.

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